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BE THE VOICE FOR THE PAWS

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  I n the national capital of India, a man was caught on CCTV attacking a dog outside his house.  In the state of Karnataka, a lady smashed 8 innocent puppies. 11 monkeys were brutally killed and dumped near a highway in Rajasthan.  A cow was run over and killed by a vehicle in Chhattisgarh. Wounded horses were used for marriage processions in Uttar Pradesh.  These are examples of some brutal and heinous atrocities against animals. Everyday there are many such cases. But a country which does not care much about murdering people, can never care enough about killing mute animals.    In March 2020, due to the COVID-19 lockdown, there were reports of sightings of various rare species of animals in the streets and on national highways. The absence of human movement and reduced pollution prompted them to roam freely. At the same time, many strays on the roads died due to lack of food and proper care. Just like humans are finding it difficult to survive this deadly pandemic, so are anima

EDUCATING THE BACKBONE OF INDIA’S FUTURE

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  ‘A person aged 7 and above who can both, read and write with understanding in any language is considered literate’. This is the commonly used definition when we talk about literacy. When India became independent in 1947, the literacy rate was very low. The earliest figures from the year 1951 show that the literacy rate was only 16.67%. Fast forward to 1991 it was 52.10%, which is still quite low as only half of the population was literate. The last census was carried out in 2011, according to which India's literacy rate was 74.4%, with 82.14% male literacy rate and 65.46% female literacy rate. The latest survey carried out by the National Statistical Commission in 2017-2018 shows that literacy rate has increased to 77.7%.   Since Independence, India's literacy rate has increased six times.  But the increase over the years has been very sluggish. The Global Literacy Index for people aged above 15 years is 86.3% which is much higher than our national literacy rate. The Unit

BYSTANDER EFFECT: Let's Avoid Being a Passive Witness?

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  In 1964, Kitty Genovese was killed outside her apartment building in densely populated Queens, New York. There were dozens of people that heard the pleas of the young woman screaming for help, but none of them took any action. This infamous murder launched the decades of studies investing the ‘Bystander Effect’ amoung humans.   Most of us must have heard the infamous News headline: Blinded by rage, man stabs wife repeatedly in Delhi's Rohini as bystanders record incident. What is even more shocking is that the brutal crime took place in the daylight with more than a hundred bystanders, some of whom were busy recording the incident. It is needless to mention that not even a single person tried to rescue the poor woman.   Such instances invite numerous questions behind such human psychology. If you witness an emergency situation right before your eyes, you would certainly take some sort of action to help the person in trouble? All of us might believe that this is true, but

THE DON’TS OF DONATION

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  It is the month of November.  Gunju, a 10-year-old stands outside the NDLS Railway Station in the national capital. She fears the night that is approaching. As the traffic starts to decrease, she can clearly hear the winds howling. She does not have a proper home like thousands of other children. She lives under a temporary plastic shelter on the footpath, a few kilometres away from the tracks.  During the day the sun and the crowd come to her rescue. After the sun sets, the temperature starts to drop quickly. She only has a thin piece of cloth that will protect her from the biting cold. She prays for the night to pass quickly; for the first rays of sun to hit her. One day she sees people coming with cartons towards the footpath where she lives. The people started distributing blankets to all living on the footpath. Gunju waited patiently till one person came to her and handed her a blanket. She looked at him and gave a wide smile. For her, he was a saviour.  The blanket was torn at

LIFE AFTER LIFE: ORGAN DONATION IN INDIA

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  And Lord Shiva was enraged and beheaded Ganesha; And Parvati was pained beyond grief. “Ganesha! Oh My Son! Be it that it was me.” She wailed, and Lord Shiva was moved and transplanted an elephant’s head onto Ganesha and Ganesha became the Deity of Learning and Wisdom                'Shiva Purana' : Hindu Mythology   O rgan transplantation is a process in which an organ is removed from the donor’s body and placed in the body of a recipient, to compensate for a damaged or missing organ. Organ transplantation has succeeded to associate life and death for the benefits of the society. Common transplantations include kidneys, heart, liver, pancreas, intestines, lungs, bones, bone marrow, skin, and corneas. Kidney, part of the liver, part of the pancreas, part of the lungs or part of the intestines can be donated by living donors, but most of the donations occur after the donor has died.   The procedure of organ transplantation is a crucial health guarantee for society.

Everyday is a Fight to Survive

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  C ash, money, bank statements haven't we heard it all how sometimes, due to any crisis in the average household can lead to disbalance in the financial and flow of money in the home. Many people go through a financial crisis, and going through this stage is very typical. What if the person is not getting job satisfaction? What if the economy is failing? There could be many reasons? According to a survey done in rural households, many children are forced to leave studying and concentrate on doing domestic chores to bring money to the house; this practice had been followed for many years. The educated class knows the importance of education and how education can have the most positive impact on our lives and help us understand society's functioning. An NGO tries to bring a change to the needy, and running an NGO is just like running a family. Any financial crisis or irregularity in inflow of donations can force an NGO to shut down its doors .  Let's be clear, anything

The Dyadic Between NGOs And Government

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  SSSDR is an acronym used for the Union of India.  It stands for Sovereign Socialist Secular Democratic Republic of India. Here, I would like to emphasize on one term – “Socialist”. It was introduced into the Constitution of India in 1967. Socialism is a political and economic theory which advocates that the means of production distribution and exchange at a regulated by the community as a whole. To put it into simple words, in a socialist system, the power lies with the masses.   India is a diverse land; topographically, culturally and socially. It has seen big empires rise and fall, governments come and go. Governing such a diverse land is a task, which is why governments in India face a lot of criticism from different groups of people for different reasons. The government tries to address the problems faced by public at major level but there is a huge disparity between what is expected by the citizens and what is delivered to them. There are various agencies, individuals and